MULTILINGUALISM: EMPOWERING INDIVIDUALS, TRANSFORMING SOCIETIES

MEITS is a major interdisciplinary research project funded under the AHRC Open World Research Initiative. Linguistic competence in more than one language – being multilingual – sits at the heart of the study of modern languages and literatures, distinguishing it from cognate disciplines. Through six interlocking research strands we investigate how the insights gained from stepping outside a single language, culture and mode of thought are vital to individuals and societies.


Recent News

Pop-Up World of Languages

The MEITS project's Pop-Up World of Languages, the first museum of its kind in the UK, has opened its doors to the public. Learn more about our Pop-Up World of Languages and view a short film about it.

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International conference on Multilingual identity: interdisciplinary perspectives in Cambridge

Researchers from all over the world made the journey to Cambridge to contribute to the MEITS conference on multilingual identity from 11-13th September 2019.

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Upcoming Events

19 Oct

Pop-Up World of Languages – the first UK pop-up museum of languages!

Cambridge, Belfast, Edinburgh, Nottingham & London
11 Feb

Linguistic Justice in Policy and Practice

Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, Hills Road, Cambridge

Policy Journal

Languages, Society & Policy: Mission

LSP publishes high-quality peer-reviewed language research in accessible and non-technical language to promote policy engagement and provide expertise to policy makers, journalists and stakeholders in education, health, business and elsewhere. 

Language underpins every aspect of human activity, social, economic and cultural. Insights from language and linguistics research can improve policy making and have the potential to impact on a wide range of areas of public life. 

We publish Policy Papers, Opinion Articles,  short and accessible papers from the Research Lab and Dialogues. We also occasionally publish policy reviews.

LSP promotes the multidisciplinarity of linguistics and language research and welcomes contributions from diverse disciplines including, but not restricted to, linguistics, modern languages, cultural studies, cognitive science, developmental linguistics and psychology, sociolinguistics, corpus and computational linguistics, education, health sciences, psychology and neuroscience. For information on how to submit a paper, please see our Editorial Guidelines.

ISSN 2515-3854

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Recent Blog

A drop-down menu for languages? Historical-sociolinguistic research in the archives

Archives are wonderful places. They allow us not only to, quite literally, touch the past, but also to learn a lot about languages and how these were used centuries ago. As a historical sociolinguist working on the history of Dutch, I have visited countless archives over the past few years, mostly in the Netherlands, in order to collect data. Following the research tradition that is known as language history ‘from below’, I am particularly interested in handwritten sources from the private domain, such as letters and diaries. These first-person accounts give us unique insights into ‘ordinary’ language use, which has been neglected in traditional history writing, but can still be found in the archives

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Why are Breton speakers protesting about street names?

Speaking and promoting minoritised languages often involves struggles against the nation state. In some cases, these struggles can be on a local level. In Brittany, one especially current issue is the “francisation”—Frenchification—of place names. A protest was organised in September in Telgruc-sur-Mer, a small town in the far west of Brittany, an area where the vast majority of names come from Breton, including the name Telgruc itself.

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A bright future for the Welsh Language

The Welsh government aims to reach 1 million Welsh speakers by 2050, and there is little doubt that great progress has been made. The number of Welsh speakers has risen from 25% to just under 30% of the population of Wales over the last decade. Plans are afoot to significantly increase Welsh-medium school places over the coming years, with parents choosing a Welsh-medium education for cultural, educational and employment reasons (Hodges, 2011). The percentage of Welsh speakers is unsurprisingly reflected in Wales’ education system, which has seen a rise from 50,000 Welsh-medium school pupils in 2008/9 to over 75,000 pupils in 2017/18.

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