MULTILINGUALISM: EMPOWERING INDIVIDUALS, TRANSFORMING SOCIETIES

MEITS is a major interdisciplinary research project funded under the AHRC Open World Research Initiative. Linguistic competence in more than one language – being multilingual – sits at the heart of the study of modern languages and literatures, distinguishing it from cognate disciplines. Through six interlocking research strands we investigate how the insights gained from stepping outside a single language, culture and mode of thought are vital to individuals and societies.


Recent News

‘Language Journeys’ workshop

On 17th November 2018 eleven multilingual Year 9 students from four Nottinghamshire schools visited the University of Nottingham for the fourth in a series of five workshops exploring what it means to be multilingual. 

READ ARTICLE

‘Picture a Language’ Easter photo competition

Send us an image of what languages mean to you, with a chance to have it published!

READ ARTICLE

Upcoming Events

24 May

L3 acquisition of Mandarin SFPs ba and ne /  Indefinite NPs as subjects in L2&L3 Mandarin grammars

Room 7, Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (FAMES), CB3 9DA, Cambridge
14 Jun

L2 acquisition of the Chinese ba construction / TP ellipsis in English speakers’ L2 Chinese

Room 7, Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (FAMES), CB3 9DA, Cambridge

Policy Journal

Languages, Society & Policy: Mission

LSP publishes high-quality peer-reviewed language research in accessible and non-technical language to promote policy engagement and provide expertise to policy makers, journalists and stakeholders in education, health, business and elsewhere. 

Language underpins every aspect of human activity, social, economic and cultural. Insights from language and linguistics research can improve policy making and have the potential to impact on a wide range of areas of public life. 

We publish Policy Papers, Opinion Articles,  short and accessible papers from the Research Lab and Dialogues. We also occasionally publish policy reviews.

LSP promotes the multidisciplinarity of linguistics and language research and welcomes contributions from diverse disciplines including, but not restricted to, linguistics, modern languages, cultural studies, cognitive science, developmental linguistics and psychology, sociolinguistics, corpus and computational linguistics, education, health sciences, psychology and neuroscience. For information on how to submit a paper, please see our Editorial Guidelines.

ISSN 2515-3854

MORE

Recent Blog

Double minoritisation: non-standard varieties of minoritised languages

For a long time, non-standard varieties of widely-spoken languages, such as regional dialects of English, were stigmatised. On the BBC, regional accents are still rare. But there is evidence that non-standard varieties are beginning to be valued as assets to our cultural diversity. Earlier this year, the New York Times British-Irish Dialect Quiz was a big hit.

READ ARTICLE

“The two cultures” 60 years later

This week marks the 60th anniversary of one of the most famous and controversial academic lectures in European history: C. P. Snow’s Rede lecture at Cambridge University entitled: “The two cultures”. The lecture is complex and has many interwoven themes, some specifically British, others consciously global, but I think it would be fair to say that at its heart lies C P Snow’s criticism of the lack of respect, interest and knowledge that the “literary” academics have when it comes to science, particularly applied science and technology. The topic has been extensively debated in the context of its intellectual history and subsequent criticism, but my question is a slightly different one: does it still have anything relevant to say to sciences and humanities of our time?

READ ARTICLE

Noticing languages - noticing linguistic inequality

I’ve just been called up for Jury Service – my first time – and I’m approaching it with what I’m guessing is the usual mix of curiosity, eagerness to be useful, and nervousness. The last time I set foot in a courtroom was doing work experience as a teenager, shadowing a court interpreter. The defendant who needed the interpreter was convicted of a driving offence. He said he hadn’t understood the rules, but, I discovered, that was no defence, though it might mean a more lenient sentence.

READ ARTICLE

Watch / Listen


Our Partners